splashesintobooks

Somewhere to review books I'm reading without giving away any spoilers!

Review: All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker

Title: All is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walkerall-is-not-forgotten

Author: Sheila Norton

Publisher: HQ, Harper Collins

Published: February 23rd, 2017

Pages: 320

Rating: 3.5/5

My Review:

Oh boy, this is a very different psychological suspense filled thriller that leaves you reeling and thinking long after you finish reading it and that ending I’d never imagined! I’m going to try not to give anything away in this review, so apologise in advance in case anything slips!

When school girl Jenny Kramer is attacked and raped at a local party, her parents are given the option of her having a controversial drug that will erase her memory of what happened to her. This may seem like a great treatment, but though the memories may have been erased, it takes time for her physical injuries to heal and even longer for any emotional healing. This isn’t really helped by her parents contrasting reactions where her Mum pretends nothing happened whilst her Dad is obsessed with bringing the perpetrator to justice. Jenny’s inability to recall the events is traumatic for her, with dramatic consequences. As the narrator, the Kramer family therapist, reveals the thoughts and feelings of Jenny, her parents and others involved, there are so many secrets, surprises and shocks it really is a thriller. And that ending – wow!

The use of a single point of view relating everything generally works well, though it sometimes seemed to slip slightly so it felt more like a storyteller rather than a character relating events and this spoiled the flow at times for me.The idea of being to erase memories of traumatic events by taking a drug soon after experiencing them is made believable by the author’s descriptions. In the Author’s Note at the end of the book, it seems such drug therapy is being sought to help treat military personnel suffering from PTSD. Having read this I’m really not sure about the benefits of such treatment in the long term, but the book certainly makes you think about it. Horrendous events, betrayal, broken relationships, mistrust, deceit and danger pervade every chapter. This is not a cosy read, but raises many consideration and leaves an impact on the reader.

Many thanks to the publishers for gifting me a copy of this novel with no obligation. This is my honest review.

Synopsis

In the small, affluent town of Fairview, Connecticut everything seems picture perfect.

Until one night when young Jenny Kramer is attacked at a local party. In the hours immediately after, she is given a controversial drug to medically erase her memory of the violent assault. But, in the weeks and months that follow, as she heals from her physical wounds, and with no factual recall of the attack, Jenny struggles with her raging emotional memory. Her father, Tom, becomes obsessed with his inability to find her attacker and seek justice while her mother, Charlotte, prefers to pretend this horrific event did not touch her perfect country club world.

As they seek help for their daughter, the fault lines within their marriage and their close-knit community emerge from the shadows where they have been hidden for years, and the relentless quest to find the monster who invaded their town – or perhaps lives among them – drive this psychological thriller to a shocking and unexpected conclusion.

Buy Links:    Amazon (UK)         Amazon (US)        Barnes and Noble

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This entry was posted on February 23, 2017 by in Adult and tagged , , , , , , , .

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